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    Conservative Fiction: The New Deal Sucked!




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    If you want to know how the New Deal treated ordinary Americans, this choice really matters. Let's look at a figure Shlaes gives twice in her book and again in her Wall Street Journal editorial: She has unemployment at 20 percent in the recession. That's appalling--almost as bad as 23 percent in Based on such a statistic, you could think the New Deal wasn't alleviating the Great Depression. But that number hides something: A third of the people Shlaes counts as unemployed had a job that the New Deal gave them through its relief programs. Now, you may say, wait: Those people really shouldn't count as employed--we're not interested in government make-work, we're interested in the real economy.

    Fair enough--and if you look again at Historical Statistics of the United States, you'll see another measure of unemployment--private, nonfarm unemployment--measuring the real, industrial economy. And on that measure, unemployment again runs markedly lower under Roosevelt than under Hoover. John Maynard Keynes might have explained that the New Deal wasn't just offering make-work, it was stimulating the economy--and Shlaes in fact at one point says the same: Economic journalist David Warsh slammed the book in his economicprincipals.

    The result is a book just as fanciful, but much less convincing than Kenneth Roberts' account of Oliver Wiswell's long career as a critic of the first American Revolution. For Roberts never argued that the colonies' War for Independence was a mistake -- rather he showed that it was a very painful ordeal, with good arguments on both sides of the issues. Safely ensconced in Nova Scotia at the very end of the book, Wiswell allows, "Perhaps something great will come even to that rabble But what about the enormous growth of the American economy since ?

    What about the seventy five years that have passed sucksd another depression? All-in-all, the PWA funded over 34, de;ression between andmany of which remain in use to this day. Some were actually created by Congress, while others were formed directly by executive order. Cole and Lee E. Ohanian have concluded that without intervention, a much bigger recovery would have begun ina full seven years earlier than the marker they believe the Depression actually ended at. Suicidal Tendencies Not surprisingly, the suicide rate skyrocketed in the s.

    The New Advance prolonged the Topper Depression. If they apply to go a New New Front, repeating the women that led to one of the photo presidencies in Higher ranking is not the way to do it. But everywhere, he passed east impossible challenges.

    While the rate was Welcome Diversions The Great Depression even impacted pop culture. The board game Monopoly was created in and was an immediate hit. Getting rich, even in Monopoly money, let people dream of better days and gave them hope. In addition, the Disney movie The Three Little Pigs, released inwas an allegorical tale, with the Big Bad Wolf representing the Great Depression and the three porcine brothers representing the values of hard work and teamwork. All Aboard to Nowhere Few people had the resources to travel in search of work or a better life.

    Strict biographical retelling gives way to argument. So he emphasizes the mild steps that Hoover took to prevent the Depression—he clearly knew that a crash was coming. He shows the concrete actions Hoover took to alleviate suffering and shore up the crumbling economy. He forced large groups of companies not to fire their workers. He took what were probably the correct steps with the Federal Reserve. But none of it made a significant difference. The cities filled with groups of destitute, hopeless men.

    Hoover felt he was powerless in the face of the rising fear. The great Roman general Fabius said that results are the teachers of fools. An Extraordinary Life in Extraordinary Times ggeat a wonderful study in the value of humility in politics, not just by those who make decisions grest by those who judge the decision-makers—journalists and historians both. I mean, because Whyte writes in such a diametrically opposed spirit. The History of Canada from Sucke the opposite of Conrad Black turns out to be The great depression sucked highly effective writing strategy. Whyte avoids both pretense and axe grinding.

    He brings a humanizing touch to geopolitics, and even when dealing with arcane subjects like deflationary economics, Hoover makes for fluid, attractive reading. Hoover, after his failure in office, retreated into a nostalgic rage that will come across as highly recognizable to the contemporary news reader. The Democratic elites who controlled the mass media humiliated Hoover, and he loathed them in return. The world in which he had triumphed, the world he recognized, had simply passed. The people who knew about how hard the business of government is knew how competent Hoover was, and these included Robert F. Under examination, he turns out to have been an extremely brilliant man, vastly more practical than ideological, who nonetheless failed utterly.

    One of the great bugbears of historical biography is its inherent tendency to exaggerate the power of individuals to change history. The times steamrolled the man. Government spending in was totally insufficient to overcome the fear that gripped America. The gold standard spread deflation globally, but a world without the gold standard was inconceivable to Hoover.

    Depression sucked great The

    Whyte argues, convincingly, that Hoover was perfectly poised to deal with the Depression, which makes his failure only more fascinating. She starts each chapter with a rat-a-tat of just-the-facts, but instead of GDP, which represents the overall economy, she quotes the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which represents the maybe 10 percent of Americans who owned stock. Instead she chooses different estimates of unemployment that she acknowledges show a much larger share of Americans out of work during the New Deal. If you want to know how the New Deal treated ordinary Americans, this choice really matters.

    She has unemployment at 20 percent in the recession. But that number hides something: A third of the people Shlaes counts as unemployed had a job that the New Deal gave them through its relief programs. Now, you may say, wait: And on that measure, unemployment again runs markedly lower under Roosevelt than under Hoover. Economic journalist David Warsh slammed the book in his economicprincipals. But what about the enormous growth of the American economy since ? What about the seventy five years that have passed without another depression?


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